All Images Copyright of James Mellick
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Tales from the Nursery
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Birthing
Sire Hamlet, baby Haley and Dam Holly
The Art of James Mellick: Our Weimaraners 
The “Weimaraner Period” was a time between the marriage of our daughters and the arrival of our grandchildren. We raised puppies for the love and pleasure because, with the amount of time they required, raising puppies properly is a break even business at best. When our “real” grandchildren came along we no longer had time to care for puppies. During this period, if you were looking for Weimaraner puppies, our website was number one in the search engines for a couple years. We had interest from across the country and overseas. Because of the quality of our puppies they were called “Mellick Weimaraners”. We treated them like our children, raised in our bedroom for the first three weeks of their lives. We were too involved with them and were concerned as parents how they fared with their new families.
The Weimaraner is a high maintenance breed. It is not so much the cost of buying the dog but the veterinarian expenses over its lifetime. Like any active large dog breed, it is susceptible to both benign and mast cell tumors. Our stud dog Hamlet succumbed to cancer in 2008 at the age of 11 years and I cried like a baby when we had to put him down. We have had two female Weims that needed surgery for a twisted stomach--I think that is the greatest concern for Weim.
The Weim needs to be with it’s family and does not separate well like a Lab might. It is highly intelligent and can be charmingly manipulative. It does not do well being left alone in a crate for more than 4 hours a day, so if both people in a family work out of the house all day, I would recommend against acquiring a Weimaraner.
Pregnant Holly two days before her second litter and she is carrying eleven puppies. Each time we took X-rays to know how many to expect during the long hours of labor. Click the button to see the photo documentation of the first litter birth process. These photos were published in a Mexican Veterinarian journal
“Mama OPEC” 2007; inspired by Dam Holly. In this case nine puppies are latched on to her since she usually had one free nipple that wasn’t that productive
I would title this “Motherhood”. Spending the first three weeks in our master bedroom and the last five weeks in a heated kennel in our basement, these pups were pampered for eight weeks, from their birth to their departure. We put an extra-ordinary amount of time into their care by monitoring their weight gain , nutrition and hygiene daily.

We did not get much sleep during the puppies first three weeks in our bedroom. There were constant whimpering and sucking sounds coming from the foot of the bed. I was always alert to hear if Holly might be laying on a baby even though we constructed the whelping box with overhangs for the puppies to lay under. On two occasions I had to rescue a puppy trapped under her exhausted mother.

The puppies were a source of much amusement.
This is the first litter’s outing at 3-4 weeks old.
It all began with the adoption our male stud Hamlet. Two years later we purchased Holly, a “child bride” for Hamlet but they did not consummate their relationship until Holly was two years old. We allowed Holly to whelp three litters and she was the “queen mother” from the minute they were born to when they left the kennel.
The second litter’s first wagon ride.
Why Dogs?
Our Weimaraners
Canine Sculpture
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Why Dogs?
Our Weimaraners
Canine Sculpture
My Dogs
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Gallery 1
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Human Allegory
Animal Allegory
Fantasy Birds
Gallery 2
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Weimaraner Behavior